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Frequently Asked Questions

General

What are your hours?
Plant Receiving Hours:
Monday - Friday, 6 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, Closed
Sunday, Closed
No Appointment is Necessary
How can my company apply for credit with Recovery 1, Inc.?
If your company has been in business for at least five years, you can apply for an account. If you have not been in business for five years, but have been for more than two years, please call for more information.
For all others, including a one-time job or load, we accept cash, check (with check verification), and credit card (Visa™, MasterCard™, and American Express™).

Demolition

Can I send in tree stumps, shrubs, and dirt with the demolition debris?
Yes, we offer a lower rate for dedicated loads of stumps and brush; however, you can include them with demolition debris.

Is it okay to send in roofing materials with the demolition debris?
Roofing materials that have been tested and confirmed to be asbestos-free can be sent in as part of a full demolition.

What can I send in as part of a full building demolition?
Entire building demolition projects can be sent to Recovery 1, Inc. after you have:

1. Completed the A.H.E.R.A. building inspection and provided us with a copy.
2. Removed all asbestos-containing materials and provided us with a letter of abatement completion.
3. Removed all mercury-containing devices, including fluorescent lamps, silent switches, thermostats, etc.
4. Removed all PCB-containing devices (Note: Light ballasts are of primary concern in residential demolition; however, all PCB-containing devices must be removed).
5. Tested all of the painted surfaces and removed any that contain lead-based paint.

Asbestos

Can Recovery 1, Inc. test materials for asbestos?
Yes, we have a polarized light microscope and can test materials for asbestos. Our testing capacity is primarily designed to protect our employees and customers from being exposed to asbestos. We do not typically offer our service to customers and refer those inquiries to certified laboratories.

What is asbestos?
Asbestos is the name given to a number of naturally occurring fibrous silicate minerals that have been mined for their useful properties such as thermal insulation, chemical and thermal stability, and high tensile strength. These minerals are made up of long, thin fibers that are somewhat similar to fiberglass. Asbestos is neither soluble nor volatile; however, small fibers may occur in suspension in both air and water. The three most common types of asbestos are: a) chrysotile, b) amosite, and c) crocidolite. Chrysotile, also known as white asbestos, is a member of the serpentine mineral group and makes up approximately 90% to 95% of all asbestos found in buildings in the United States. Other asbestos types may be blue, gray, or brown. Materials that are designated as less than 1% asbestos do not require abatement.
Why doesn't Recovery 1, Inc. accept these materials as non-asbestos?
Researchers still have not determined a 'safe level' of exposure, but we know that the greater and longer the exposure, the greater the risk of contracting an asbestos-related disease is. Unlike transfer stations and landfills, our employees work directly with the materials we process, and we do not want to expose them to any asbestos-containing materials. Therefore, we require that all test results indicate that asbestos is non-detectable in all materials brought to Recovery 1, Inc. for processing.

Where is asbestos most likely to be found?
Asbestos was commonly used for acoustic insulation, thermal insulation, fireproofing, and in other building materials. Asbestos fibers are incredibly strong and have properties that make them resistant to heat. Many products are in use today that contain asbestos. Some of the more common products that may contain asbestos include:

• Acoustical Plaster
• Adhesives
• Asphalt Floor Tile
• Base Flashing
• Blown-In Insulation
• Boiler Insulation
• Breaching Insulation
• Caulking & Putties
• Ceiling Tiles & Lay-In Panels
• Cement Pipes
• Cement Siding
• Cement Wallboard
• Chalkboards
• Construction Mastics (Floor Tile, Carpet, Ceiling Tile, etc.)
• Cooling Towers
• Decorative Plaster
• Ductwork Flexible Fabric Connections
• Electrical Cloth
• Electrical Panel Partitions
• Electrical Wiring Insulation
• Elevator Brake Shoes
• Elevator Equipment Panels
• Fire Blankets
• Fire Curtains
• Fire Doors
• Fireproofing Materials
• Flooring Backing
• HVAC Duct Insulation
• Heating & Electrical Ducts
• High Temperature Gaskets
• Joint Compounds
• Laboratory Gloves
• Laboratory Hoods & Table Tops
• Packing Materials for Wall & Floor Penetrations
• Pipe Insulation (Corrugated Air-Cell Block, etc.)
• Roofing Felt
• Roofing Shingles
• Spackling Compounds
• Spray-Applied Insulation
• Taping Compounds (Thermal)
• Textured Paints & Coatings
• Thermal Paper Products
• Vinyl Floor Tile
• Vinyl Sheet Flooring
• Vinyl Wall Coverings
• Wallboard

Wasn't asbestos banned?
No. There has been a rather common misunderstanding about the 1989 EPA ban on asbestos-containing materials, products, or uses. Newspaper and magazine articles, internet information, and even some currently available (but outdated) documents from the EPA and other governmental agencies may contain statements about an EPA asbestos ban that are incorrect. In fact, in 1991 the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals vacated much of the so-called 'Asbestos Ban and Phase-Out' rule and remanded it to the EPA. Thus, much of the original 1989 EPA ban on the U.S. manufacturing, importation, processing, and distribution in commerce of many asbestos-containing product categories was set aside and did not take effect. However, six asbestos-containing product categories are still subject to the 1989 asbestos ban. The EPA has no existing bans on most other asbestos-containing products or uses.

What does the term 'friable asbestos' mean?
In the asbestos industry, the term 'friable' is used to describe asbestos that can be reduced to dust by hand pressure. 'Non-friable' means asbestos that is too hard to be reduced to dust by hand.

When does asbestos become a hazard?
Asbestos is not always an immediate hazard. In fact, if asbestos can be maintained in good condition, it is recommended that it be left alone with periodic surveillance performed to monitor its condition. It is only when asbestos-containing materials (ACM) are disturbed or the materials become damaged, enabling it to be inhaled or ingested, that it becomes a hazard.

Why is asbestos a hazard?
Asbestos is made up of microscopic bundles of fibers that may become airborne when disturbed. These fibers get into the air and may be inhaled into the lungs, where they may cause significant health problems. Researchers still have not determined a 'safe level' of exposure but we know that the greater and longer the exposure, the greater the risk of contracting an asbestos-related disease is.

What is asbestos used for?
The main uses of asbestos include its use in building materials, paper products, asbestos-cement products, friction products, textiles, packing and gasket materials, and asbestos-reinforced plastics.


A.H.E.R.A.

What does A.H.E.R.A. mean?
A.H.E.R.A. is an acronym that stands for Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act, which was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1986 as a provision of the Toxics Substances Control Act (TSCA). A.H.E.R.A. inspectors are trained to identify 'suspect asbestos-containing materials' and extract samples which are tested to determine if asbestos is present.

Where do I find a qualified A.H.E.R.A. inspector?
Look in the phone directory under 'Asbestos Abatement Services' for laboratories and inspection services. Contact them for more information on survey procedures and costs.

Does Recovery 1, Inc. have A.H.E.R.A. inspectors on staff?
Yes, however, our inspectors are here to help us maintain an asbestos-free working environment for our employees and customers. We do not provide inspection services for hire.

Can Recovery 1, Inc. test materials for asbestos?
Yes, we have a polarized light microscope and can test materials for asbestos. Our testing capacity is primarily designed to protect our employees and customers from being exposed to asbestos. We do not typically offer our service to customers and refer those inquiries to certified laboratories.

I tore down a building and did not perform an A.H.E.R.A. inspection. Is it too late to do one now?
The standard answer is yes; however, it really depends upon the structure and how many suspect materials could reasonably be expected in the building. As an example: a garage that was built in 1975 and was not finished on the inside will contain minimal suspect materials and, thus, you may be able to identify and test all of the suspect materials after it has been demolished. Please be aware that in Washington State you are supposed to secure permits from your local air agency. They will require an inspection before issuing a demolition permit. The purpose of the inspection is to make sure that you are not exposing people to the hazards of asbestos during the demolition and disposal activities. If asbestos is identified in the structure after it has been demolished, you have defeated the purpose of the inspection and may be subject to fines by several state agencies.